Horticultural Traditions

Long before the rise of annual grain based industrial agriculture, and the dismantling of our [...]

This farmer is carrying on a tradition that is millenia old.

How Farming Almost Destroyed Ancient Human Civilization

  By Annalee Newitz Roughly 9,000 years ago, humans had mastered farming to the point where [...]

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Cornstalks Everywhere But Nothing Else, Not Even A Bee

By  ROBERT KRULWICH We’ll start in a cornfield — we’ll call it an Iowa cornfield [...]

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Regreening program to restore one-sixth of Ethiopia’s land

Tree and shrub-planting program has transformed degraded and deforested land across Africa, with Ethiopia planning [...]

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First Great British Bee Count reveals allotments make the best bee habitats

Allotments produced more bee sightings than parks, gardens and the countryside over the 12-week summer [...]

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Why I grow: Backyard mushroom cultivation

A farm on a log: “Growing mushrooms on logs is probably the easiest way you [...]

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Makerspaces connect people and projects in Vancouver

EAST VANCOUVER ARTIST Jodi Stark turns found and reclaimed wood into jewellery, picture frames, and tables. [...]

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Rain Man: How one Tucson resident harvests the rain

By Dan Kraker When it comes to rainfall, Tucson is not the beneficiary of Mother Nature’s [...]

Tucson's resident rainwater guru Brad Lancaster explains how he has transformed the sidewalk along his street into an oasis of hardy desert shrubs and fruit-bearing succulents. Lancaster cut away the curb where storm runoff from the street can flow to where it is needed to water plants and has shaped the landscape to make full use of the desert's sparse rainfall. Nick Cote / For MPR News

Incorporating biomimicry into building design

Matthew Webb, Umow Lai | 14 August 2014 In the past 20 years there have been [...]

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